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Rise 360 Users - Rejoice! A question for you all...


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I have always had a mantra of keep it simple with Rise 360 and you will be successful. But I wanted to check with folks that have worked with their platforms and see if there are best practices for versioning up with it.

We are having alot of fun with Rise 360 and we are establishing a course for our new hire managers. I have showed off a few prototypes and people are sold on it.

Great

Here is the thought. We have like 5 guides that are going to be rolled out slowly to the organization to make up a managers toolkit. Some of the content in the guides are underway and would add their own major section.

Importantly - I am not looking to do major “scoring” changes with the course...as in I am not looking to change the “structure” of how the course will score with question and answers. But more content if we add sections can dramatically disturb the slide count.

We will be tacking on new sections to the rise course.

Any thoughts from your experiences on how to not have this approach crash and burn?
One big SCO? Or a page (or LP) of little SCOs? Anyone try the big SCO with success?

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Best answer by gstager 13 May 2022, 20:11

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Hmm… some of my thoughts...

I have always been a big fan of smaller SCORM packages.

Keep the content in “bite-size” chunks.

I hang out in the Captivate forums too and I always cringe when someone pops in talking about the problems they are having with their 500+ slide project. 😬

I like to give a little content with a quick “check for understanding” (ie quiz w/5 or fewer questions).

… NEXT …

I like this approach for several reasons

  1. Participants can easily fit these little bits of content into their busy schedules. If any are like me, they like to finish something they start rather than try to pick up in the middle some time later. Like books. I hate stopping mid chapter. This allows folks to cross things off their list and feel like they are making progress.
  2. Updating small projects is easier and less of a hassle when needing to later upload the updated file. The small ones can go up quick with few issues than needing to update huge files and waiting.
  3. Easier to use small topic modules across multiple courses where applicable. This is not the case if those topics are embedded in some behemoth course somewhere.
  4. For those that need re-training on certain topics, it is easier to target those areas with specialized assignments from a group of modules that all fit together than to ask them to work around topics that don’t apply from within a larger course.
  5. Would you rather tell your boss that you created 50 learning objects this year or just one?

Hope the ideas give you some food for thought.

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I get it Greg. I really do. And your thoughts are usually best practices that I live by.

It is the idea of using it to help

  1. collapse down some documentation projects
  2. get our managers the content they need to get going effectively in a single space
  3. when you keep RIse working in a pretty linear fashion it shines particularly bright
  4. think about our experiences in Docebo university

@ryan.woods - do you have a few tenants that you all live by when working with rise. Overall I find most of your content to be brief and to the point. You take a moment to use some of the interative objects to document a screen on occasion.

Now all of this said? There is nothing stopping 3 to 5 SCOs living in a single course...giving a person still a solid experience. I do think coming in and out of containers will feel like a dissatisfier.

All of this said - we may be shoving a little too deep when this is a really a content management problem and where LCMS’s begin to shine.

 

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@dklinger - perhaps I do not understand the dilemma.

We have a single course with 28 SCOs alone. That does not count videos, documents, quizzes, etc

54 items in total across 13 sections.

Perhaps this seems large? It is our most highly demanded course and no one has complained that there is too much.

While there are 54 items to consume - each one can be easily tackled in a relatively short amount of time such that one can easily jump into class and complete another item or two in one sitting - thus continually making progress.

Course objectives are what they are and they should be what drives the content necessary to get all the learners to the point where they have met them. I was thinking it was a question of how to split it all up. In that case, my point was that if I had 100 “slides” - I would prefer 20 SCOs of 5 slides each vs 1 big 100 slide SCO.

Perhaps your question is more about Rise and less about chunking content…?

I cannot speak to Rise at all. Never used it to develop.

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We are on the same page @gstager - if I can keep everyone in one experience? That would be great.

By taking people in and out of SCOs is not horrific...but I guess the answer is? It is what it is.

I think it is going to be the way to go (many SCOs in a single Docebo course - having people come in and out of one SCO to go to the next to avoid disrupting peoples experiences during updating).

 

Rise is interesting because it is a scrolling experience. The concept of a page or slide falls to the side.

 

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@dklinger - I am sure some others may disagree with me on this but while I have not developed in Rise, I have taken courses in Rise.

A critique I have of Rise is, in fact, the scrolling. To me, the courses must be extra short or it becomes much like the “scroll-wheel-of-death” you find in some webpages where they cram all the info on a single page and you scroll endlessly looking for information.

I would much rather see all my content on the page and navigate with a link to the next full page. No scroll. Just good navigation and also like a website - non-linear in fashion.

This is just a personal preference of course.

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@gstager- I actually agree there too. A person that is purposely designing with Rise can slow down the “scroll-wheel-of-death” by injecting purposeful stops and interactions at different times. Instructional design does not need to fall to the waste side with Rise - it still needs to be done purposely for an experience that will promote learning (and not just scrolling).

What I do think? Is that the scrolling component supports responsive design in a way that I cant reproduce without thinking about it alot more.

We also use EasyGenerator - and I love it for basic courses. In someways it is a neat competitor of Rise, but (PURELY OPINION) it doesn’t come with some of the same animation (and eye candy) that gives Rise its pop.

I do like Captivates fluid boxes and its metaphor for responsive design as well - but (PURELY OPINION) at least the earlier version of Captivate fluid boxes meant slowing down your production workflow...and like any eLearning project? We need to consider the right tool for the right problem.

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We have made the switch between one SCO containing the whole course, to multiple smaller bite size SCOs uploaded to Docebo that also have documents / videos etc in them as well.

I like Rise as a concept, but as my firm requires authentic (human) audio in our courses we cannot use it very often, as there is no way of adding audio to the written text.  We have trialled adding an audio block under the text that has the spoken word in it - this works ok.  It has certainly come on as a product since it’s early days!

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@Neil Patterson - if you can? Get yourself a trial EasyGenerator. It does the voice over automatically per slide.

It doesnt have all the bells and whistles of Rise - but it does get that piece right.

And thank you for your input to multiple SCOs in a single course.

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I just encountered another Rise (scrolling) thing going thru the Gamification course in DU.

I guess - just think of this as support for making content fit the screen rather than using the scrolling approach of Rise.

 

At first - I kept clicking NEXT and couldn’t figure out why I kept being presented with a new overview.

I was trying to simply go to the next slide or whatever. Even after I scrolled all the way to the bottom - I clicked the next button when I was done scrolling. Turns out I needed to click a link on the page.

Then I finally got to the knowledge check. Since the submit button did not fit on the screen - I selected my boxes and clicked NEXT

Chose my answers and clicked NEXT since submit button was off-screen.

OOPS

Had to go back and do it again. Check my boxes then scroll down to find the submit button.

Of course - if the NEXT button was removed it would have forced me to use the navigation within the SCO

At first pass - the navigation within the SCO  (1)  did not look like navigation - it just looked like an overview and a list of what I would expect. So when I was ready to move on I clicked NEXT  (2)  because that was the intuitive thing for me to do when  I was done with that screen.

It was more intuitive to click NEXT at position 2 than to click what did not appear to be a link at position 1

That was incorrect. I had to go back.

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I want to have a look at this course now, as that sounds complicated!

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I want to have a look at this course now, as that sounds complicated!

Once I got going and learned the flow - it was fine - but I admit it was a bit frustrating at first.

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I want to have a look at this course now, as that sounds complicated!

Once I got going and learned the flow - it was fine - but I admit it was a bit frustrating at first.

I see what you mean.  So their course is set up with multiple Rise SCOs, where you need to navigate within each and also have the Next button to move to the next SCO.  I fell down that trap too.  It is confusing when to use the in SCO navigation and when to use the course navigation.  Perhaps that is more design than product though?  It can work very well 😊

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I see what you mean.  So their course is set up with multiple Rise SCOs, where you need to navigate within each and also have the Next button to move to the next SCO.  I fell down that trap too.  It is confusing when to use the in SCO navigation and when to use the course navigation.  Perhaps that is more design than product though?  It can work very well 😊

@Neil Patterson - so that at the core? Is the other half of my concern - making SCOs into bite size chunks are cool. @gstager is right - more manageable. BUT if the UI is going to face the same questions and challenges - then I need to figure out how to minimize that.

One method is the mega SCO (I want to put a cape on it and have it fly away).

The other is many courses on a page or in an LP.

Oh….to lump or split….to lump or split.

Now I can cheat and make a gif at the bottom to show people where to click Next….but that also seems aggressive when the user interface and design should be as clean as possible.

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Also - I recognize that thinking about what is desired as a  “trackable unit” does need to come into account.

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@dklinger - mega SCO - saving the planet, one SCORM course at a time 🤣

One way round it could be to disable the Docebo navigation buttons to remove some of the confusion?  It would mean that a user would have to go back to the Docebo Table of Contents each time though.  You could create a button in Rise to end that specific SCO, which will return a user to the ToC?

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 Yeah - the initial thing was this overview page. It does have the Start Course / Resume Course button at the top but based on how stuff is cut off - it is clear there is more downstream so you scroll down.

At that point, when you reach the bottom - the start course button is out of sight and out of mind. Besides, who really wants to scroll back up at that point?

 

I don’t know what Rise can do but I was thinking that if that button was at the bottom it would would be more intuitive as a next step - or is that a Docebo button and custom header or something…?

 

I am done with the course so I cannot seem to get the blue buttons to appear again for a screenshot but it seems you can segment a single Rise SCO into slides or pages too.

Initially - the blue buttons did not stand out to me as a button either because they were missing the familiar terms of NEXT or CONTINUE but clicking one only seemed to allow additional scrolling as opposed to navigating to the top of a new page so I’m not sure of the point there of forcing that click. A few times I wanted to click NEXT there too.

I’ve chosen to disable the Docebo navigation on my own platform and have users simply select the next learning object in the table of contents.

For mobile - perhaps “scrolling” is better since  swiping the thumb is the norm but on the desktop which is where I reside along with our customer base - it has a different feel.

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